Thursday, 28 August 2014

2015: The challenges of Jonathan

 

When the Chairman, PDP Board of Trustees (BOT), Chief Tony Anenih, announced in Calabar that President Goodluck Jonathan would contest the presidential election in 2015 on PDP platform, many were not surprised. It was an open secret. But others wondered if Anenih considered the many issues that could cause obstruction to Jonathan's re-election bid. From Boko Haram, to the kidnap of Chibok girls, some of the issues surrounding the Jonathan administration are as strong as death.
From the onset when the doctrine of necessity played out the drama that later had him emerge as substantive president, Jonathan's position as president appeared to be precarious. At every point, there was always a controversial issue around him or governance and occasionally taking the debate back to the political decision taken by the National Assembly on Tuesday, February 9, 2010 to empower him to serve as acting president  in order to resolve the constitutional   breach by the then ailing President Musa Yar’Adua .
Fully supported by civil society organizations, past leaders, Nigerian armed forces, the United States, European Union, African Union coupled with public opinion, Jonathan was empowered to serve as Acting President, thus offering him the opportunity to become president without contesting election. And despite outrage from the north, he went ahead to contest 2011 presidential election which opportuned him to write his name on the marble of history.
But unfortunately, his administration was adjudged in many quarters as the weakest and the most challenged in the democratic experiment.
The Jonathan administration is often faced with denunciations from the opposition concerning performance. Whenever the President claimed his government was on track to fulfill its campaign promises, the opposition always thought otherwise, and they said so quite profusely. The major areas of challenges have always been security, infrsatructure and employment. The last is perceived by many as a time bomb that may explode in no distant time as more graduates are being churned out of tertiary institutions annually without any hope of profitable engagement. Majority of Nigerians don't believe the Jonathan government has even achieved anything, the overwhelming opinion being that corruption is on the increase and business as usual continues to be the order of the day.



Meddlesome opposition
The opposition parties especially the All progressive Congress, APC, have always disputed the bogus claims of Jonathan's aides, dismissing them as purveyors of blatant lies and constantly accusing Jonathan's government of impunity.
The APC often remarked that only a government that swam in corruption and lacked self-respect and decency could pick as its aides people who had been shown to be an epitome of corruption by collecting funds for contracts that were not executed. On many occasions, opposition had advised Nigerians not to believe the bogus claims and promises of government saying the government lies through its teeth to deceive many. Nothing the government did ever appeared right in the face of the opposition. There was never a time that opposition came out to support Jonathan's deed no matter how noble it's intent was. It always looked at the other side of the coin.
For instance, when Dr. Okupe claimed government will generate 780,000 jobs in through the ‘Young Graduate Employment Scheme’ and 5,000 jobs in each of the 36 states through SURE-P, opposition advised the teeming young graduates who have no jobs not to allow themselves to be hoodwinked by this promise, advising them to remember that this same administration promised to create 10,000 jobs in each of the 36 states through SURE-P in the past but couldn't do so.
On power generation,opposition always urged Nigerians to ensure that their generators are in good working condition, as the government’s promise of stable electricity has never been realistic. It accused government of deceit by making promises it could not keep.
“The government should be ashamed to tell Nigerians it has been able to generate only 4,500MW from a huge expenditure of 16 billion dollars! No one needs a rocket scientist to know that 4,500MW cannot ensure stable electricity supply in a country of 160 million people, when South Africa, with less than a third of Nigeria’s population, generates over 40,000MW!!! ’’
Jonathan severally got knocks on every issue ranging from security, conflicts, politics, governance, infrastructure and the opposition which threatened to make Nigeria ungovernable and made good their threat recently threatened to form a parallel government should Jonathan win 2015 presidential election.


Boko Haram
If there is anything that has affected the Jonathan administration more, it is the insecurity situation in the country. Since 2010, the Nigerian nation has on daily basis experienced an upsurge of activities that threatens and endangers its national security. Kidnappings, arms proliferation, armed robberies, drug and human trafficking and violence associated with ethnic, religious and political conflicts are among these threats. Recently however, a new dimension of bomb blasts, occurring on a daily-basis, is a major focus of attention in Nigeria's security analysis. The Boko-Haram Islamic militant sect has often owned up as the perpetrators of the bomb explosions.
Before Boko Haram, the Jos crises that claimed dozens of human lives were known to be limited to Plateau State and so also were the Niger Delta crises limited to the areas of the creeks of the River Niger. The sect claims responsibility for several bombings and snip activities in the northern and central Nigeria, thereby placing the nation at the threshold of disintegration.

While some people believe that the insurgency is a result of social, religious, economic, and political imbroglio, the main cause of the insurgency in Nigeria still remains a closed book to the majority. The sect started as anti-government policy campaigner, vandalising government properties and killing innocent people under the pretext of being anti-western education. It claimed to be an anti-western culture, working against the modern ways of governance and trying to establish Islamic Sharia rule.
Nigerians, especially majority of Christians and even some of the Muslims who were of the view that Boko Haram represented Islamic doctrine had challenged devout Muslims to find means of curbing the nefarious activities of the sect that is painting Islam in a bad colour. Its operations are deadly and provocative and capable of igniting religious war in the country if not nipped in the bud. But it is increasingly becoming clearer to Nigerians and the international community that Boko Haram was just a criminal gang using the name of Islam to perpetuate evil.
The menace of the sect is rooted in the Northern part of the country especially in Borno, Bauchi and Yobe States. At the time the cause of the insurgency was first believed to be political, the federal government of Nigeria set up a panel to engage the sect members in a dialogue as a tactic to bring down the intensity of the insurgency but this has proved to be unworkable since the sect refused any discussion with the government.
The truth however remains that the insurgency started in the Northern part of the country. Since the sect at formation claimed to represent anti-western education, the level of education among the people of the North is nothing to write home about. Some of the youths in the region are less exposed to western education but Arabic teachings. And they are highly submissive to their leaders. They are easily influenced by their leaders and these youths are the ones that are mostly influenced to join the sect and wreak havoc on the country.
The JTF, the military attack solution launched by the government does seem to have the where-withal to operate effectively. The terrorists appear to be more sophisticated than the military, hence they are often overpowered by the insurgents. Besides, there are inconsistencies, hypocrisy and insincerity about the root cause of the matter.
The bombings and killings in the north have degenerated over the years to the point of kidnapping school girls and taking over of an entire community, Gwoza by the terrorists. Nigerians are waiting to see how government translates its promises to secure their lives, meets its promises of increased power supply, implement its job creation strategies, reconstruct the nation’s landscape for better transportation, and boosts agricultural production for a better nourished populace.
Thousands of people have been killed in terror attacks in the North since the insurgents came on board.


Kidnap of Chibok girls
This is perhaps, the greatest tragedy of the Jonathan administration. The abduction of about 300 Chibok school girls and the subsequent inability to rescue them have continued to generate outrage both at home and abroad. This is distasteful news to a country where, already,10.5million children of school age are out of school, and where no more than four per cent of girls in the North-East of Nigeria ever manage to complete secondary school.
Protests have come and died but the problem is beyond what money can buy. There is no alternative to life and compensating the parents of the girls with money does not solve the problem when the girls are still alive and can be rescued.
The worse part of the story is that despite assistance by the international community, nothing has come out of it.
Recently, the Northern Elders Forum (NEF) advised President Jonathan to forget his re-election in 2015 if the abducted schoolgirls are not released before the end of October.
The forum alleged that the frequent communal clashes in the north were being engineered to weaken the region politically and economically as a way to exploit such weaknesses for electoral benefits in 2015.
In a recent statement signed by two members of the forum, Mr. Solomon Dalung and Dr. Hakeem Baba Ahmed, had accused the presidency of lacking the will to fight insurgency even as it decried the deep-seated corruption and incompetence in the country, which it said has “allowed a band of terrorists to take and hold vast parts of our land and population hostage, while every citizen lives in fear that they will be its next victim. The security situation in our nation today represents the most serious threat to our individual and collective lives in our entire history.
“The reality is that the threat posed by what appears to be an insurgency that has many manifestations and defies a clear and consistent identity is growing due to the absence of a clear national consensus over its nature and its solutions.
“We don't believe that the Nigerian military cannot defeat these terrorists. We also reject the notion that multiple internal security challenges such as attacks on villages, ethno-religious conflicts and banditry springing up by the day in many parts of the north are all a coincidence. We are convinced that most of these conflicts are being engineered to weaken the north politically and economically by interests which intend to exploit such weaknesses for electoral benefits.
“In the light of our firm conviction that the insurgency and related security challenges pose a threat to the 2015 elections and the survival of our nation, we strongly advise President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan to bring an end to the insurgency in all its manifestations and produce the Chibok girls before the end of October, 2014.The circumstances under which our fellow citizens in and around Gwoza in Borno State in particular live and die will not be tolerated by any people who have a government and a leader who swore to defend them, and they must be reversed immediately.
“If President Jonathan fails to do this, Nigerians will be left with the only conclusion that he has forfeited his right to ask for our mandate beyond 2015. At all cost, the 2015 elections must be free and fair. This means that any threat which may provide a cover for militarising the electoral process must be eliminated before the elections. Every part of Nigeria must participate in these elections, and no citizen should be deprived of his or her right to vote under any excuse,” the forum said.


Rotation of power
As 2015 general elections draw closer, the fact that the “North” is strongly opposed to Jonathan’s 2015 presidential ambition is becoming more vehement. The actions and inactions of those who claim to represent and speak for the north have become more glaring to political observers.
So many voices are rising from the north in the bid to stop Jonathan's ambition for 2015.
The north had been alleging that the ruling Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) formally had an agreement signed, which they claimed, Jonathan was a signatory to. By this they opined the presidency should rotate between the north and the south. To these northerners, Jonathan by the doctrine of necessity has served Yar' Adua's two-term in office and contesting another term would be a third.
But fanning the amber of sectional politics cum north and south divide will not do the north any good because apart from sharpening the divide in the north between the minority north and the core northerners, it could end up alienating the north from mainstream politics and into a defenceless corner of opposition politics, a trend which is alien to their style of politics.
Besides, those familiar with history know that the north once dominated governance in Nigeria for decades in a manner that made the south appeared like visitors in their home country.
For the North to be opposed to Jonathan's re-election could garner more support for Jonathan from the south.
With the forces of disintegration in all the regions waiting to be triggered, the unity of Nigeria may be shaken after such an election, thereby proving right the earlier predictions from the United States that Nigeria will disintegrate by the year 2015.


His Patience
Behind every successful man is a woman and for any problem a man encounters in his life time, a woman somewhere must have played a major role. Anywhere Jonathan's success story is told, Dame Patience will be featured prominently. She is part of his success story and part of his problems. She is his asset as well as his problem. There is nothing Nigerians have not used Dame Patience Jonathan, the beautiful wife of the president's name to do. Cartoonists, comedians, political critics have found in her a viable weapon both for their jokes and against her husband's government. The issue is, Dame Jonathan does not appear to understand when to lend a hand to her husband and when to stand aside. But what she did well or shouldn't have done was with good intent. Unfortunately, Dame Patience Jonathan has not learnt lessons from some of her careless outbursts. And her assistants perhaps contributed to the problem by not advising her that sometimes, silence is golden.

Another Nigerian Doctor dies of Ebola in Port-Harcourt; two down with Ebola

Another Nigerian  doctor, who secretly treated a diplomat who had contact with Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer, has reportedly died of Ebola in Nigeria.
The doctor, whose name was not mentioned  died on Friday while his wife has also taken ill and has been quarantined in Port Harcourt. However, the diplomat the doctor treated is still alive.
Red Cross workers carry the body of a woman who died of the Ebola virus during a 1995 outbreak in the Congo
The diplomat, who was part of the team who met with Patrick Sawyer in Lagos, evaded Nigerian federal government surveillance and flew to Port Harcourt, Rivers State for treatment for the disease. The late doctor then took him to a hotel for treatment.
As a result of this, 70 people have been quarantined. The doctor's hospital, Good Heart Hospital in Rivers State, has been shut down. The unnamed hotel, where the secret treatment took place, has also been shut down.
Minister of health, Professor Onyebuchi Chukwu, has confirmed the development saying that two people in Port Harcourt, Rivers State, have contracted Ebola Virus Disease (EVD).

This is the first time an Ebola case would be confirmed outside Lagos. According to Chukwu, the total number of cases of Ebola recorded in the country now stands at 15, against the 13 reported on Monday.

He said the two additional cases of the disease were recorded in Port Harcourt, where a staff member of ECOWAS who had contact with Patrick Sawyer but evaded surveillance, checked into a hospital in the city with symptoms of the deadly virus.

Kate Henshaw quits acting for politics

 

Star actress, Kate Henshaw, says she is quitting acting for eight years for politics .
Henshaw told  Sahara TV, that her venture into politics for eight years is okay as overstay is the reason for much of the problems in Nigeria, adding that it equally breeds corruption on the part of government officials.
She stated that she would not enter politics for the purpose of financial gain but to “push” herself to better the country.
“I don’t hope to be there forever. I just want to make noise and leave when the ovation is loudest. That’s the best way. I don’t want to be there for 10 years, 12 years, 16 years, that’s the best way. I want to do other things. 4- 8 years. That’s the limit…you can hold me to my word. There has to be another person, who will go through the process, who would want to try.
“That’s the problem. Too many people stay in one place for so long and other people just lose hope and say why would I even bother”.
The Nollywood star said she does not have much money to dole out.
“There’s no money. I can’t match the people who have been in the system for 20 to 30 years. I’m going with God and my heart. I’m not sharing money. If you continue sharing money, it will never stop. If you want a change, a true change, then vote for me and you’ll see the change. But if you want money, hey, go for money and stay where you are and don’t ever complain”.
 

Wednesday, 27 August 2014

EBOLA: FG postpones re-opening of primary and secondary schools to October 13

 EBOLA ABUJA

The resumption of both public and private primary and secondary schools in the country has been postponed to October 13, 2014.
Mallam Ibrahim Shekarau, the Minister of Education made the announcement after meeting with states’ commissioners of education to discuss the risk posed by the dreaded Ebola virus disease in the education sector.
He said: “All primary and secondary schools, both public and private are to remain closed until Monday, 13th October, 2014, which is the new school resumption date for all schools throughout the federation.
“This is to ensure that adequate preventive measures are put in place before the students report back to school.
“All state Ministries of Education are to immediately organize and ensure that at least, two staff in each school, both public and private are trained by appropriate health workers on how to handle any suspected case of Ebola and also embark on immediate sensitization of all teaching and non-teaching staff in all schools on preventive measures. This training of staff must be concluded not later than 15th September, 2014.”
Shekarau also directed that, “ All state Ministries of education should establish a working and monitoring team for effective supervision of school activities before and after opening of schools. Each state ministry of education should appoint a designated desk officer not later than 1st September, 2014, who should also receive appropriate training and who must report on daily basis to the honourable Commissioner on situation in the schools. The names of such desk officers, their phone numbers and e-mail addresses should be communicated to the headquarters of the Federal Ministry of Education not later than 1st September, 2014.
“All primary and secondary schools, both public and private, should be provided with a minimum of two (2) blood pressure measuring equipment by the state ministries of education. The state ministries should determine the number of such equipment required and forward same to the Federal Ministry of Education not later than 1st SWeptember. [They] will liaise with the Federal Ministry of Health to ensure that appropriate equipment are procured.”
He  stressed that the above measures apply in all federal government colleges and directed that all ongoing summer schools in both public and private schools be suspended with immediate effect.
“All private primary and secondary schools must comply with the directives given under these preventive measures. State governments are called upon to support their state ministries of education with all necessary funds to ensure effective implementation of these preventive measures.”
The federal government also directed all states government to sanction any private or public school that doesn’t comply with the directives.
The Minister added that, “Our concern is for the children and we would go to any length to ensure both private and public schools comply. You can imagine if a child is infected in a boarding school of say about 600 children; it would be very dangerous.We are not saying there is Ebola in all states of the federation, but we are putting preventive measures in place.”

Ebola: Babcock University cordons off University, screens students, visitors

 

Students and visitors to Babcock University, Ilisan undergo Ebola screening before being allowed entrance to the University. They are not allowed one kilometre close except they present their Ebola-free certificate to King David Security which is in charge of the security of the school.
To this effect, students who are returning to school and other visitors are diverted to a large field where the medical staff of Babcock University Teaching hospital would subject them to all kinds of tests including form-filling where they answer questions like: have you travelled in the past three weeks? Have been to Liberia, Guinea, Congo, Lagos, Enugu and other Ebola hot-zones? Afterward, you go to the next section where you answer questions like: when was the last time you had fever, cough, running stomach, vomiting, nose-bleeding and other questions. The next step would be the screening proper after which you would awarded a certificate if cleared that would now take you into the University premises.
Students who are returning to school must obtain clearance at the gate one-kilometer to the campus before  being allowed into the hostels.
Sanitizers, dettol disinfectant and other kinds of things are giving to visitors inside the premises and a leaflet containing general information on Ebola is served at the gate by the University's Teaching Hospital.
Inside, sanitizers are everywhere and in every office and it's as if dettol would soon go out of fashion.
Many of the parents who took their children back to school felt humiliated by this strict approach but the security and the medical personnel said they must subject everybody to this test including those who claimed they have been tested before.
A medical staff said they must comply because even the man who brought the disease to Nigeria knew he had it before entering the country.
“ Therefore, it is not impossible for someone who has had a primary or secondary contact to bring his ward or child back to school. Besides, there are a lot  of other people we don't know their mission here but our primary purpose is to protect the students and ourselves.”
A visitor to the school expressed shock at the extreme measure but said it was the right thing to do.
However, one is not sure whether other private universities comply with the same measure.

Nigeria has only one Ebola patient--Health Minister

 

Nigeria said Tuesday that two more people had been released from isolation after recovering from Ebola, leaving only one living patient with the disease in the country.
According to the health ministry, Nigeria has recorded 13 confirmed cases of Ebola, including the Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer, who brought the virus to the economic capital Lagos on July 20 and died five days later.
In all five people have died of the disease in Nigeria.
Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu announced that an additional two patients had been discharged, bringing the number of those released to seven.
"Two of the treated patients, a male doctor and a female nurse were discharged yesterday evening, 25th August, 2014, having satisfied the criteria for discharge," he told reporters in Abuja.
The only patient in the country who currently has Ebola is the wife of a doctor who treated Sawyer, he added.
"She is stable but still on treatment at the isolation ward in Lagos," Chukwu said.
Dozens of people who were at risk of exposure are being monitored and the caseload could rise.
The World Health Organization said last week that it was encouraged by the situation in Nigeria, given that all of the confirmed cases came from a single chain of transmission.
The deadliest-ever outbreak of the virus has killed more than 1,400 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since the start of the year.

Enugu Assembly impeaches Deputy Governor

 


The Enugu State House of Assembly has impeached the state’s Deputy Governor, Sunday Onyebuchi, from office for running a poultry farm.
The deputy Governor was voted out of office Tuesday by the House Assembly.
The deputy governor’s removal is believed to have been masterminded by Governor Sullivan Chime.
The Assembly accused Mr. Onyebuchi  of operating a commercial poultry at his official residence and of disobeying Governor  Chime, charges that, under the law, do no qualify as impeachment offences.
The impeached deputy governor had told the impeachment panel set up by the state’s chief judge that Mr. Chime also operated piggery farms at the Government House.
Giving evidence before the panel last Wednesday, Mr. Onyebuchi said the governor’s poultry was hurriedly evacuated shortly after the panel commenced sitting.
Mr. Onyebuchi revealed that the state government had budgeted for the maintenance of the poultry since 2011.
The embattled deputy governor, who tendered the state’s budget between 2011 and 2014, said funds had always been provided for the poultry he operated.
He insisted that he did not commit any offence that could warrant his impeachment and that the poultry farms he and the governor were operating were there before they assumed office in 2007.

Monday, 25 August 2014

Late Patrick Sawyer's 'Liberian Girl' exposed, Wife calls him an idiot.

After her apologies on her open letter to Nigeria over Patrick Sawyer's importation of Ebola into Nigeria, the US based widow, pleaded with Nigerians to avoid cursing the Sawyer name as her growing daughters are still Sawyers and that Nigerians can direct all their anger to the culprit himself, Patrick Sawyer.

Read her message.
 

Decontee also said,
  "Patrick and I have been separated (not yet divorced) for the past one year and seven months. He left me when I was seven months pregnant with our third child. We already had a 3-year-old, and a 4-year-old together, with a third on the way. He left us all and started a new family in Liberia. I was left by myself to now raise three children alone, one of which (my 3-year-old at the time) was diagnosed with autism. That in itself was a challenge (and still is). Patrick left us, and he never turned back. We only communicated occasionally regarding our children. I was under so much emotional stress during my labor that I almost lost my last child, Bella. Thank God she is now a healthy 18months old girl. Patrick and I now have a 6yr old, a 5yr old, and an 18months old together (all girls). He and his mistress have a 2-year-old daughter together in Liberia. They lived together in the house that he and I built together. Can you believe the idiot named the child he had with his mistress after me? The man was deeply confused and troubled. So, my dear, my letter I wrote was not to defend my husband (the man that abandoned me with two small children while I was pregnant for the third). My letter was to shine light on the beyond broken healthcare system and bad governance of Liberia under President Sirleaf and previous presidents. Ebola didn’t start with Patrick in Liberia, as we both know. Ebola was in Liberia from a traveler from Guinea since February of this year. The government knew about it and did nothing. Many Liberians, including myself, called out to the government then to close the borders. They didn’t do so until one of their own, Patrick, died in July.
Many people died before Patrick and their lives were just as important. That is my frustration. Ebola didn’t have to go to Nigeria, Africa’s most populated country, had the Liberian government taken drastic actions sooner. I too, have family members and friends in Nigeria, and now they are at risk because of Patrick’s actions. In spite of my anger and disappointment with him, I don’t believe that he did this with evil intent (I could be wrong). I believe his actions was that of a desperate man. And sad for everyone involved, Nigeria was closer than the U.S. This is just my take on what he could have been thinking (of course, I could be wrong). 
My regret is that I was so caught up in my own pain and frustration, that I neglected to see the pain of the innocent people both in Liberia and Nigeria who are affected by Patrick’s actions. For that, I am deeply sorry. The last thing I wanted to do was to cause them pain. It is a pain I know. It is a pain I don’t want them to have. The interesting thing is, I didn’t even know Patrick was in Nigeria until my sister living in Boston (USA) told me the day before he died. Patrick barely talked with me. He was too busy being a Liberian government big shot. Power, if not used to glorify God, can bring down a nation. It brought down my family. I finally had a lawyer in Liberia serve Patrick with divorce papers exactly a week before he died. He never signed it. Now I’m left as his widow taking the heat while his mistress sits in peace. I cannot apologize for Patrick’s actions because I didn’t cause them. He did a lot of things I didn’t like; going to Nigeria was one of them. His act was one of a desperate man. Many Nigerians and Liberians are affected because of that act of desperation. I want to reach out to them and express how deeply saddened and sorry I am for their loss and their pain. I do apologize if my words have cost anyone who is grieving more pain. I fall on my knees and ask God for his healing power for all of those who are still infected with Ebola. I pray for all of the families who loved ones were taken away by this merciless killer Ebola, especially those affected by Patrick’s actions. I pray for the people of Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. I pray for the people of Africa. We are all affected by Ebola. It will take all of us working together to eradicate Ebola. Ebola must go, and we must kick it out together. The God in me wouldn’t allow me to go and hide. He strengthens me to stay and fight. I’m fighting to help bring aid to my brothers and sisters in Africa. I am committed to this fight. But I cannot do it by myself. I need all of your help. The good people of the world, not just Africa, need to come together, and fight together. We can either do it together and win, or we can tear each other down and loose. This is not just my fight, or Africa’s fight. This is the world’s fight. Thank you, and God bless you all."



Patrick and I have been separated (not yet divorced) for the past one year and seven months. He left me when I was seven months pregnant with our third child. We already had a 3-year-old, and a 4-year-old together, with a third on the way. He left us all and started a new family in Liberia. I was left by myself to now raise three children alone, one of which (my 3-year-old at the time) was diagnosed with autism. That in itself was a challenge (and still is). Patrick left us, and he never turned back. We only communicated occasionally regarding our children. I was under so much emotional stress during my labor that I almost lost my last child, Bella. Thank God she is now a healthy 18months old girl. Patrick and I now have a 6yr old, a 5yr old, and an 18months old together (all girls). He and his mistress have a 2-year-old daughter together in Liberia. They lived together in the house that he and I built together. Can you believe the idiot named the child he had with his mistress after me? The man was deeply confused and troubled. So, my dear, my letter I wrote was not to defend my husband (the man that abandoned me with two small children while I was pregnant for the third). My letter was to shine light on the beyond broken healthcare system and bad governance of Liberia under President Sirleaf and previous presidents. Ebola didn’t start with Patrick in Liberia, as we both know. Ebola was in Liberia from a traveler from Guinea since February of this year. The government knew about it and did nothing. Many Liberians, including myself, called out to the government then to close the borders. They didn’t do so until one of their own, Patrick, died in July.

Read more at: [REVEALED] How Patrick Sawyer Abandoned His Wife And Children For A Liberian Mistress | LATEST NIGERIAN NEWS BREAKING HEADLINES NEWSPAPERS
Patrick and I have been separated (not yet divorced) for the past one year and seven months. He left me when I was seven months pregnant with our third child. We already had a 3-year-old, and a 4-year-old together, with a third on the way. He left us all and started a new family in Liberia. I was left by myself to now raise three children alone, one of which (my 3-year-old at the time) was diagnosed with autism. That in itself was a challenge (and still is). Patrick left us, and he never turned back. We only communicated occasionally regarding our children. I was under so much emotional stress during my labor that I almost lost my last child, Bella. Thank God she is now a healthy 18months old girl. Patrick and I now have a 6yr old, a 5yr old, and an 18months old together (all girls). He and his mistress have a 2-year-old daughter together in Liberia. They lived together in the house that he and I built together. Can you believe the idiot named the child he had with his mistress after me? The man was deeply confused and troubled. So, my dear, my letter I wrote was not to defend my husband (the man that abandoned me with two small children while I was pregnant for the third). My letter was to shine light on the beyond broken healthcare system and bad governance of Liberia under President Sirleaf and previous presidents. Ebola didn’t start with Patrick in Liberia, as we both know. Ebola was in Liberia from a traveler from Guinea since February of this year. The government knew about it and did nothing. Many Liberians, including myself, called out to the government then to close the borders. They didn’t do so until one of their own, Patrick, died in July.

Read more at: [REVEALED] How Patrick Sawyer Abandoned His Wife And Children For A Liberian Mistress | LATEST NIGERIAN NEWS BREAKING HEADLINES NEWSPAPERS

Sunday, 24 August 2014

First British Ebola victim is flown to UK hospital for treatment.


The British National living in Sierra Leone, being evacuated on an RAF jet has landed at the Royal Free Hospital in London, which has the UK's  only high level isolation unit (HLIU). The patient is a healthcare worker in Sierra Leone.
 Ebola crisis, Briton catches Ebola, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, British national, first British ebola victim, Department of Health, West Africa
 The decision to fly him back was taken after a top level meeting during which Ministers concluded there was 'no risk' that the repatriation would trigger an outbreak in the UK.
A worried Vikki Littlemore said, 'Jesus, WHY bring it into the Country?'
This Ebola thing though. Hmmmn.
Epidemic: Doctors assist patients in Sierra Leone, one of the countries worst affected by ebola
 Doctors assist patients in Sierra Leone, one of the countries worst affected by ebola.



Ebola: Fiance of late Nurse Justina Ejelonu tests negative, speaks up.

Mr Dennis, Fiancé of the Late Justina Ejelonu, nurse who died of the Ebola Virus has been cleared to be free of the virus after testing positve to Ebola twice.. His clearance came after a third test had been carried out on him which came back negative. He walked off the center in good health according to doctors who spoke anonymously with Saharareporters.
Dennis

However, the gentleman revealed that Justina lost a two-month pregnancy, vomited severally on him while she collapsed and had to be carried to hospital by him. After, Justina was admitted he hung around the hospital , occasionally going into the Ebola ward cater for her as nurses and doctors abandoned the nurse to her fate at the treatment center.
14 days after Justina died, Dennis began to have high temperature and showing fever-like symptoms, instead of panicking he turned himself in to the treatment center for observation. Luckily for him, he came out negative.



 

Wickedness: What a woman did to her house help because she urinated in bed.

It took so much courage to take a look at all these pictures. This is BARBARIC! In fact, wickedness in high places. May God have mercy on the female beast who did this. The little girl in the pictures below was rushed to the hospital yesterday as a result of her 'madam' asking her to sit on a burning electric cooker! Just because she allegedly bed wetted.
maid3

maid

maid2

Please pray for her. And don't fail to leave your comments please.
maid1

Saturday, 23 August 2014

DSS warns Nigerians to watch out for female suicide bombers in Reverend Sisters' regalia.

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The Department of State Services has urged the public to the careful and vigilant following the theft of 13 pieces of Catholic Sisters' regalia in Kano.
According to the statement, on the 20th of August, unidentified persons broke into a tailoring shop located at 55 Odutola Street, Sabon Gari, Kano state and made away with the clothings materials.
Nigerians will recall that recently, members of the terrorist group, Boko Haram, have been carrying out attacks on the people disguising as females and actually engaging services of females.
With the recent trend of female suicide bombings in the country, the theft of these regalia heightens concerns about the possibility of terrorist elements using same to perpetrate acts of terror.  
DSS said;
“Consequently, this service wishes to draw the attention of the public to this development and to call on all citizens to be more circumspect and exercise greater vigilance with users of such peculiar attires.We, therefore, enjoin all to continue to cooperate with law enforcement agencies through the provision of useful information on suspicious activities within their immediate environment. This service will continue to collaborate with all stakeholders as we strive to keep our country safe.



How my background influenced me - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

In an encounter with Chimamanda at Awka, Anambra state, she unveils how much influence her background had on her.

She was born in Enugu and grew up the fifth of six children in the university town of Nsukka . While growing up, her father James Nwoye Adichie was a professor of statistics at the university, and her mother Grace Ifeoma was the university's first female registrar. She is the author of Purple Hibiscus, which won the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for best first book and Half of a Yellow Sun, which won the Orange Broadband prize for fiction. She has also published numerous short stories, essays and poems. She divides her time between Nigeria and the US, where she is pursuing graduate work in the African Studies program at Yale University. In April 2014, she was named as one of 39 writers aged under 40 in the Hay Festival and Rainbow Book Club project celebrating Port Harcourt UNESCO World Book Capital 2014.


My background
I am from Abba, in Njikoka LGA. My mother is from Umunnachi in Dunukofia LGA. I grew up in Nsukka, in Enugu State, a town that remains deeply important to me, but Abba and Umunnachi were equally important to me. My childhood was filled with visits. To see my grandmother, to spend Christmas and Easter, to visit relatives. I know the stories of my great grandfather and of his father, I know where my great grandmother’s house was built, I know where our ancestral lands are. Abum nwa afo Umunnachi, nwa afo Abba, nwa afo Anambra.
Anambra State has much to be proud of. This is a state that produced that political and cultural colossus Nnamdi Azikiwe. This is a state that produced the mathematics genius Professor James Ezeilo. This is a state that produced Dora Nkem Akunyili, a woman who saved the lives of so many Nigerians by demonstrating dedicated leadership as the Director General of NAFDAC. (May her soul continue to rest in peace)
This is a state that produced Nigeria’s first professor of Statistics, Professor James Adichie, a man I also happen to call daddy. This is a state that produced the first woman to be registrar of Nigeria’s premiere university, UNN, Mrs Grace Adichie, a woman I also happen to call Mummy.
This is a state that has produced great writers. If Chinua Achebe and Flora Nwapa and Chukwuemeka Ike had not written the books they did, when they did, and how they did, I would perhaps not have had the emotional courage to write my own books. Today I honour them and all the other writers who came before me. I stand respectfully in their shadow. I also stand with great pride in the shadow of so many other daughters and sons of Anambra State.



My shame
I was not always proud of certain things about my state. I was ashamed when Anambra became a metaphor for poor governance, when our political culture was about malevolent shrines and kidnappings and burnt buildings, when our teachers were forced to become petty traders and our school children stayed at home, when Anambra was in such disarray that one of the world’s greatest storytellers, Chinua Achebe, raised the proverbial alarm by rejecting a national award.
But Anambra rallied. And, for me, that redemption, which is still an ongoing process, is personified in our former governor Peter Obi. I remember the first time I met him years ago, how struck I was, how impressed, that in a country noted for empty ostentation, our former governor travelled so simply and so noiselessly. And perhaps he is proof that you can in fact perform public service in Nigeria without destroying the eardrums of your fellow citizens and without scratching their cars with the whips of your escorts.
I was struck by other things – how he once arrived early to church, because according to him, he tried not to be late – in a society that excuses late coming by public officials – because he wanted young people to see that governors came to church on time. How he visited one of the schools handed over to the missions and gave the school prefect his direct phone number. How Government house here in Awka was often empty of hangers-on, because he had a reputation for what our people call ‘being stingy,’ which in other parts of the world would be called ‘prudently refusing to waste the people’s resources.’
Anambra was and is certainly one of the better-governed states in Nigeria. We measure good governance in terms of accountability, security, health, education, jobs, businesses. All of these, of course, are important. But there are other values that are important for a successful society. Two of those in particular are relevant to ndi Anambra and ndi Igbo in general: the values of community and consensus



What foreigners did to us
Most of the recorded history we have about the Igbo – and indeed about many other ethnic groups in Africa – came from foreigners, men and women who did not speak the language, missionaries and anthropologists and colonial government representatives who travelled through Igboland and recorded what they saw and who often had their own particular agendas. Which is to say that while they did useful and fascinating work, we still have to read their writing with a certain degree of scepticism.
However, all the history books written about Igbo people are consistent on certain things. They all noted that Igbo culture had at its heart two ostensibly conflicting qualities: a fierce individualism AND a deeply rooted sense of community.
They all also noted that Igbo people did not have a pan-Igbo authority, that they existed in small republican communities, to which that popular saying Igbo enwe eze – the Igbo have no kings – attests.
Many of these missionaries and anthropologists did not approve of the Igbo political system. Because THEY themselves had come from highly hierarchical societies, they conflated civilization with centralization. Some of them wrote that the Igbo people were not civilized. This was of course wrong. The fact that the Igbo did not have an imperial system of governance did not mean that they were not civilized.
In fact one can argue that it was a much more complex form of organization, this system that I like to call the democracy of free-born males, because it is much easier to issue an order from the top than it is to try and reach a consensus.



My love for language
I would like to tell you a little story. Some years ago, I met an academic in the US. An Igbo man. He wrote articles about Igbo culture, organized conferences about Igbo history. We had an interesting conversation during which he bemoaned the behavior of Igbo people in America.
“Do you see the Chinese children?” He asked me. “They speak Chinese and English. See the Indian kids? They speak English and Bengali. But our children speak only English!”
He was very passionate. Then his phone rang and he excused himself and said it was his daughter. He spoke English throughout the call. At the end, I tried to be funny and asked him if his children spoke Igbo with an American accent? He said no.
Something in his manner, a certain discomfort, made me ask—do your children speak Igbo?
No, he said.
But they understand? I asked.
He paused.
Well, a little, he said. Which I knew meant that they probably did not understand at all.
I was suprised. Not because it was unusual to see an Igbo whose children did not speak Igbo, but because I had imagined that THIS particular man would be an exception, since he wrote and spoke so passionately about Igbo culture. I imagined that he would not be infected with that particular condition of the Igbo – a disregard of their language.
This condition is sadly not limited to the diaspora. I once ran into a woman here in Nigeria, an old friend of my family’s, and her little son. I said kedu to the boy.
His mother quickly said no, no, no, he doesn’t speak Igbo. He speaks only English.
What struck me was not that the child spoke only English, but that his mother’s voice was filled with pride when she said ‘hei mbakwa, o da-asukwa Igbo.’ (No,he doesn't speak Igbo)
She was proud that her child did not speak Igbo.
Why? I asked
Her reply was: Igbo will confuse him. I want him to speak English well.
Later as we talked about her work and her son’s school, she mentioned that he was taking piano and French lessons. And so I asked her, “Won’t French confuse him?” (okwu ka m na-achozikwa!)
The woman’s reason -- that two languages would confuse her child -- sounds reasonable on the surface. But is it true? It is simply not true. Studies have consistently shown that children have the ability to learn multiple languages and most of all, that knowledge of one language can AID rather than HARM the knowledge of another. But I don't really need studies. I am my own proof.
I grew up speaking Igbo and English at the same. I consider both of them my first languages and I can assure you that in my almost 37 years on earth, I am yet to be confused by my knowledge of two languages.
My sister, my parents first child, was born in the US, when my father was a doctoral student. My parents made a decision to speak only Igbo to her. They knew she would learn English in school. They were determined that she speak Igbo, since she would not hear Igbo spoken around her in California. And I can assure you that she was NOT confused!
I am richer for it. Sometimes I wish I could speak beautiful Igbo full of proverbs, like my father does, and I wish my Igbo were not as anglicized as it is, but that is the reality of my generation and languages have to evolve by their very nature.
I deeply love both English and Igbo. English is the language of literature for me. But Igbo has a greater emotional weight. It is the enduring link to my past. It is the language in which my great grandmothers sang. Sometimes, when I listen to old people speaking in my hometown Abba, I am full of admiration for the complexity and the effortlessness of their speech. And I am in awe of the culture that produced this poetry, for that is what the Igbo language is when spoken well – it is poetry.



Depriving children
To deprive children of the gift of their language when they are still young enough to learn it easily is an unnecessary loss. We now have grandparents who cannot talk to their grandchildren because there is a hulking, impermeable obstacle between them called language. Even when the grandparents speak English, there is often an awkwardness in their conversations with their grandchildren, because they do not have the luxury of slipping back to Igbo when they need to, because they are navigating unfamiliar spaces, because their grandchildren become virtual strangers with whom they speak in stilted prose. The loss is made worse by imagining what could have been, the stories that could have been told, the wisdom that might have been passed down, and most of all, the subtle and grounding sense of identity that could have been imparted on the grandchildren.
Some things can’t be translated. My wonderful British-born niece Kamsiyonna once heard me say, in response to something: O di egwu. She asked me: What does it mean Aunty? And I was not sure how to translate it. To translate it literally would be to lose something.
One of the wonderful things about language, any language, is that it gives you a new set of lenses with which to look at he world. Which is why languages sometimes borrow from one another – we use the French au fait and savoir faire in English -- because communication is not about mere words but about worldviews, and worldviews are impossible to translate.
Some people argue that language is what makes culture. I disagree. I believe identity is much more complex, that identity is a sensibility, a way of being, a way of looking at the world. And so there are Igbo people who don’t necessarily speak the language but are no less Igbo than others who do.
But I focus on language because while it is not the only way of transmitting identity, it is the easiest and the most wholesome.
I'd like to go back to the story of the woman whose son did not spoke Igbo and the pride with which she related this.
The corollary of her pride is shame. Where is this shame from? Why have we, as Ama Ata Aidoo wrote in her novel CHANGES, insisted on speaking about ourselves in the same condescending tone as others have used to speak of us?
There are many Igbo people who say the same thing as the woman with the son. Others may not think that Igbo will confused their children, but they merely think it is not important in our newly globalized world. It is after all a small language spoken only in southeastern Nigeria. Kedu ebe e ji ya eje?
One thing is key in language. And this I think is key: Value. Some years ago, my cousin told me a story that his grandfather had told him, about ISA ILE, where people in a dispute would go to a god and swear that they had not lied, with the understanding that whoever had lied would die. My cousin said, ‘thank God we no longer do that.’Have we become, I wondered, a people now overly familiar with falsehood? Are we now allergic to truth? Should we not continue to have a metaphorical isa ile as a guiding principle? Should we not have a society where willfully telling lies that cause harm to others will have real consequences?
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